Staff Directory

Dr Ying Yang Name: Dr Ying Yang
Lecturer (Social Psychology)
Phone
+612 9701 4742
Organisational Area
Faculty of Health Sciences
Department
School of Behavioural and Health Sciences (NSW)
Location
Strathfield
Building 640 - Edward Clancy Building (167-169 Albert Road, Strathfield NSW 2135)-Ground-Room 640.G.10
Biographical Information

Dr Ying Yang joined ACU as lecturer in Social Psychology in July 2015. Her PhD research was focused on the cultural variance in perceiving collective emotions and the underlying mechanism. She has great interest and passion in understanding how people from different cultures perceive, think, and behave. 

Her current research is focused on 1) culture 2) collective emotion 3) social identity 4) intergroup relations. 

She has been selected to receive the Australian Government Endeavour Research Fellowship in 2016. The project seeks to explore how and why Australians and Chinese perceive collective emotions differently. This project will shed lights on the function of culture on emotion recognition and also prompt a better understanding among different cultural groups.

Publications

 

Refereed Publications

Yang, Y., Hong, Y., & Sanchez-Burks, J. (2019). Emotional aperture across East and West: How culture shapes the perception of collective affect. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 50(6), 751-762. doi: 10.1177/0022022119846412
 
Wang, J., Shi, X., Yang, Y., Zou, H., Zhang, W., & Xu, Q. (2019). The joint effect of paternal and maternal parenting behaviors on school engagement among Chinese adolescents: The mediating role of mastery goal. Frontiers in Psychology. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01587
 
Zhang, L., Zhang, S., Yang, Y., & Li, C. (2017). Attachment orientations and dispositional gratitude: The mediating role of perceived social support and self-esteem. Personality and Individual Differences, 114, 193-197. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2017.04.006

Xu, C., Yang, Y., Jin, S., Qu, Z., and Hou, L. (2016). Potential risk and its influencing factors for separated bicycle paths. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 87, 59-67. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2015.11.014

Weng, J., Xue, S., Yang, Y., Yan, X., & Qu, X. (2015). In-depth analysis of drivers' merging behaviour and rear-end crash risks in work zone merging areas. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 77, 51-61. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2015.02.002

Yang, Y., Liu, X., Fang, Y., & Hong, Y. (2014). Unresolved World War II animosity dampens empathy toward 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 45, 171-191. doi: 10.1177/0022022113509118

Hong, Y., Fang, Y., Yang, Y., & Phua, Y. D. (2013). Cultural attachment: A new theory and method to understand cross-cultural competence. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 44, 1024-1044. doi: 10.1177/0022022113480039

 

Conference Presentations

Yang, Y., & Hong, Y. (2016). The Australian national identity activated warmer feelings toward Indigenous people. Paper session presented at the 23rd International Congress of International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology. Nagoya, Japan.

Yang, Y., & Hong, Y. (2015). A Boundary condition of racial essentialism: How identity inclusiveness influences its effect on intergroup relations. Poster session will be presented at the 50th Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference. Gold Coast, Australia.

Yang, Y., Hong, Y., & Sanchez-Burks, J. (2015). Decoding collective affect: explaining cultural variation in emotional aperture abilities. Paper will be presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. Vancouver, Canada. (In the symposium: How emotions shape team functioning: implications for conformity, compensation, and conflict).

Yang, Y., Hong, Y., & Sanchez-Burks, J. (2014). Do easterners act better in identifying collective emotions than do westerners? Poster session presented at the 49th Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference. Hobart, Australia. (Nominated for the Poster Prize program).

Yang, Y. & Zou, H. (2014). Development and preliminary validation of social problem solving ability scale with Chinese adolescents. Poster session presented at the 2014 International Conference on Education, Psychology, and Social Sciences. Taipei, Taiwan.

Yang, Y., Fang, Y., & Hong, Y. (2011). Cultural attachment: host culture provides a security base for individuals. Paper session presented at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Asian Association of Social Psychology. Kunming, P. R. China.

Fang, Y., Yang, Y., & Hong, Y. (2011). Cultural Identity of Proximal Others Influences Value Shift after Mortality Salience. Paper session presented at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Asian Association of Social Psychology. Kunming, P. R. China.

Yang, Y., Zou, H., & Yao, R. (2010). Stress and resilience of Chinese government officers following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Paper session presented at the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Melbourne, Australia.

Yang, Y., Zou Hong., & Cheng, Y. (2010). The relationship between stressful life events and social adaptation of Chinese teenaged students: the role of social problem-solving ability. Paper session presented at the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Melbourne, Australia.

Yang, Y., Qu, Z., & Su, Y. (2010). Chinese governmental culture: a vital role in the resilience of local governments in heavy disaster regions after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Paper session presented at the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Melbourne, Australia.

Yu, Y., & Yang, Y. (2010). What protects migrant children from social maladjustment in China. Presented at the 27th International Congress of Applied Psychology. Melbourne, Australia. 

 

Experience

Reviewer:

Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

Peronality and Individual Differences

International Journal of Psychology

Children and Youth Services Review

Journal of Pacific-Rim Psychology

Professional Memberships

 

Member, Association for Psychological Science

Member, International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology

Member, Society of Australasian Social Psychologists

 

 

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