Staff Directory

Dr Leah Kaufmann Name: Dr Leah Kaufmann
Senior Lecturer (Psychology)
Phone
+613 9953 3015
Fax
+613 9953 3205
Organisational Area
Faculty of Health Sciences
Department
School of Behavioural and Health Sciences (VIC)
Location
Melbourne
Building 403 - The Daniel Mannix Building (8-14 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy VIC 3065)-Level 5-Room 403.5.30
Publications

PUBLISHED
Kashima, Y., Bain, P., Haslam, N., Peters, K. Laham, S. Whelan, J. Bastian, B. Loughnan, S. Kaufmann, L.,  & Fernando, J. (2009). A theory of social change. Asian Journal of Social Psychology. 12, 227-246.

Haslam, N., Ban, L., Kaufmann, L., Loughnan, S., Peters, K., Whelan, J., & Wilson, S. (2008). What makes an article influential? Predicting impact in social-personality psychology. Scientometrics, 76, 169-185.

Haslam, N., Ban, L. & Kaufmann, L. (2007). Lay conceptions of mental disorder: The folk psychiatry model. Australian Psychologist, 42, 129-137.

Kaufmann, L. & Rawlings, D. (2004).  The role of personality and musical experiences in shaping music students’ intentions to become performers. Conference proceedings from the 8th biennial International Conference of Music Perception and Cognition, Chicago, Il, United States.

IN PRESS or UNDER REVIEW
Williams, B. J., & Kaufmann, L. (In press). Good news and guidelines: Calculating reliability for the Go/No Go Association Task. (Invited resubmission, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology)

Kaufmann, L. & Haslam, N. (2012) Debugging the GNAT: Assessing the fakeability of the Go/No go Association Task.Under review

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS
Kaufmann, L.
& Haslam N. (2011). Faking the GNAT: Producing stereotype consistent and inconsistent gender-role implicit associations.Oral presentation at the 2011 conference for the European Association for Social Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden.

Kaufmann, L. & Haslam N. (2011). Some consequences of implicit and explicit ageism, and implicit attitude feedback. Oral presentation at the 40th annual conference of the Society for Australasian Social Psychologists, Manly, NSW, Australia.

Kaufmann, L. & Haslam N. (2007). Implicit associations measuring more than implicit evaluations: A Go/No Go test of the Folk Psychiatry model. Poster presented at the 2007 conference for the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, Memphis, TN, United States.

Kaufmann, L. & Haslam, N. (2006).  The role of familiarity in implicit evaluations. Oral presentation at the 35th annual conference of the Society for Australasian Social Psychologists, Canberra, Australia.

Anderson, J. A., & Kaufmann, L. (2011).  Exploring homophobia: Implicit attitudes in Australian males. Oral presentation at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Asian Association of Social Psychology, Kunming, China.

Anderson, J. A., & Kaufmann, L. (2011).  Context effect and salient social categories: Implicit attitudes towards homosexuality in Australia. Poster presented at the 2011 conference for the European Association for Social Psychology, Stockholm, Sweden.

Anderson, J. A., & Kaufmann, L. (2011).  Exploring homophobia: Implicit Attitudes in Australian Males. Oral presentation at the 40th annual conference of the Society for Australasian Social Psychologists, Manly, NSW, Australia.

Boldero, J. & Kaufmann, L. (2006). The perceived informativeness of personality feedback: The role of implicit theories, personality, self-esteem, and regulatory focus. Poster presented at the 2006 conference for the Society of Personality and Social Psychology. Palm Springs, CA, United States. January 27, 2006.

Boldero, J. & Kaufmann, L. (2005). The impact of implicit theories on the informativeness of negative personality feedback. Paper presented at the 34th annual conference of the Society for Australasian Social Psychologists, QLD, Australia.

Boldero, J. & Kaufmann, L. (2005). Impact of self-esteem on the malleability of self-knowledge. Poster presented at the sixth biennial conference of the Society for Applied Memory and Cognition, Wellington, New Zealand.

Haslam, N., Ban, L., Kaufmann, L., Loughnan, S., Peters, K., Whelan, J., & Wilson, S. (2007). What makes an article influential? Poster presented at the 37th annual conference of the Society for Australasian Social Psychologists, Brisbane, Australia.

Research
My area of research is implicit social cognition. Implicit social cognition is a relatively new area of social psychology which has developed with the establishment of implicit methods such as the IAT,GNAT and affective priming. Implicit social cognition has been found to play an important role in understanding topics such as attitudes, stereotyping and prejudice. One reason for this is because people can be reluctant to report unpopular views. More recently, these measures have been used to examine self-related topics such as implicit self-esteem and the implicit self-concept, and how these automatic or nonconscious cognitions affect our thoughts, feelings and behaviours.
 
I am interested in both implicit cognitions (e.g., implicit biases including racism, homophobia and ageism) and the development and validation of implicit methods (e.g., affective priming, IAT, GNAT), and the use of these methods to investigate how and what people think about themselves, others, and the social world without explicitly asking them (e.g., questionnaires). 
My research blog can be found at: http://blogs.acu.edu.au/leahkaufmann/
Professional Memberships

Melbourne Social Psychology Group
Association for Psychological Science (APS)
Society of Australasian Social Psychologists (SASP)
Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP)

 

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