Staff Directory

Dr David Opar Name: Dr David Opar
Senior Lecturer (Exercise Science)
Phone
+613 9953 3742
Fax
+613 9953 3095
Organisational Area
Faculty of Health Sciences
Department
School of Behavioural and Health Sciences (VIC)
Location
Melbourne
Building 403 - The Daniel Mannix Building (8-14 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy VIC 3065)-Level 1-Room 403.1.31
Biographical Information

David completed his Undergraduate degree in Human Movement at RMIT University in 2008 and was appointed as an Associate Lecturer at RMIT in 2009. David commenced his doctoral thesis (PhD) at the Queensland University of Technology in 2010 in the area of hamstring strain injuries. He was conferred his doctorate in 2013. At the beginning of 2013 David joined ACU as a Lecturer in the School of Exercise Science.

David's research focuses on hamstring strain injuries, specifically how best to identify individuals at risk of this injury and how rehabilitation practices can be improved. From his research, David also co-invented the NordBord, which is a field measure of eccentric hamstring strength.  

Publications
  1. Opar D, Williams M & Shield A. Hamstring strain injuries: Factors that lead to injury and re-injury. Sports Medicine. 2012: 42(3):209-226.
  2. Opar D, Williams M, Timmins R, Dear N & Shield A. Rate of torque and EMG development during anticipated eccentric contraction is lower in previously strained hamstrings. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2013: 41(1):116-125.   
  3. Opar D, Williams M, Timmins R, Dear N & Shield A. Knee flexor strength and bicep femoris electromyographical activity is lower in previously strained hamstrings. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. 2013: 23(3):696-703.
  4. Fyfe J, Opar D, Williams M & Shield A. Could neuromuscular inhibition play a role in hamstring strain injury recurrence? Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. 2013: 42(3):209-226.
  5. Opar D, Williams M, Piatkowski T & Shield A. A novel device using the Nordic hamstring exercise to assess eccentric knee flexor strength: a reliability and retrospective injury study. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 2013: 43(9):636-640.
  6. Opar D & Serpell B. Is there a potential relationship between prior hamstring strain injury and increased risk for future anterior cruciate ligament injury? Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2014: 95(2):401-405.
  7. Hickey J, Shield A, Williams M & Opar. D. The financial cost of hamstring strain injuries in the Australian football league. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014: 48(8):729-730.
  8. Opar D, Drezner J, Shield A, et al. Acute hamstring strain injury in track and field athletes: a 3-year observational study at the Penn Relay Carnival. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. 2014: 24(4):e254-9.
  9. Timmins R, Opar D, Williams M, Dear N, Schache A & Shield A. Reduced biceps femoris myoelectrical activity influences eccentric knee flexor weakness after repeat sprint running. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. 2014: 24(4):e299-305.
  10. Bilsborough JC, Greenway K, Opar D, Livingstone S, Cordy J & Coutts AJ. The accuracy and precision of DXA for assessing body composition in team sport athletes. Journal of Sports Sciences. 2014: 32(19):1821-8.
  11. Timmins R, Shield A, Williams M, Lorenzen C & Opar D. Biceps femoris long head muscle architecture: a reliability and retrospective injury study. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2015: 47(5):905-13.
  12. Opar D, Williams M, Timmins R, Hickey J, Duhig S & Shield A. Eccentric hamstring strength and hamstring injury risk in Australian footballers. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2015: 47(4):857-65.
  13. Opar D, Williams M, Timmins R, Hickey J, Duhig S & Shield A. The effect of previous hamstring strain injuries on the change in eccentric hamstring strength during preseason training in elite Australian footballers. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015: 43(2):377-84.
  14. Opar D, Drezner J, Shield A, et al. Acute injuries in track and field athletes: a 3-year observational study at the Penn Relay Carnival with epidemiology and medical coverage implications. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015: 43(4):816-22.
  15. Opar D, Rio E. The juxtaposition of science and medicine in sport. Can we all play together nicely? British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015: 49(10):640-1.
  16. Bilsborough JC, Greenway K, Opar D, Livingstone S, Cordy J, Bird S & Coutts AJ. Comparison of anthropometry, upper-body strength, and lower-body power characteristics in different levels of Australian football players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2015: 29(3):826-34.
  17. Bourne M, Opar D, Williams M & Shield A. Eccentric knee flexor strength and risk of hamstring injuries in rugby union: a prospective study. American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2015: 43(11):2663-70.
  18. Bourne M, Opar D, Williams M, Al Najjar A & Shield A. Muscle activation in the Nordic hamstring exercise: Impact of prior strain injury. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. 2016: 26(6):666-74.
  19. Timmins R, Shield A, Williams M & Opar D. Is there evidence to support the use of the angle of peak torque as a marker of hamstring injury and re-injury risk? Sports Medicine. 2016: 46(1):7-13.
  20. Timmins R, Bourne M, Shield A, Williams M, Lorenzen C & Opar D. Biceps femoris architecture and strength in athletes with a prior ACL reconstruction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2016: 48(3):337-45.
  21. Timmins R, Ruddy J, Presland J, Maniar N, Shield A, Williams M & Opar D. Architectural changes of the biceps femoris after concentric or eccentric training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2016: 48(3):499-508.
  22. Tofari P, Opar D, Kemp J, Billaut F & Cormack S. Reliability of measures of quadriceps muscle function using magnetic stimulation. Muscle & Nerve. 2016: 53(5):770-8.
  23. Chalker W, Shield A, Opar D, Keogh J. Comparisons of eccentric knee flexor strength and asymmetries across elite, sub-elite and school level cricket players. PeerJ. 2016: 4:e1594.
  24. Maniar N, Shield A, Williams M, Timmins R, Opar D. Hamstring strength and flexibility after hamstring strain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016: 50(15):909-20.
  25. Timmins R, Bourne M, Shield A, Williams M, Lorenzen C & Opar D. Short biceps femoris fascicles and eccentric knee flexor weakness increase the risk of hamstring injury in elite football (soccer): a prospective cohort study. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Epub ahead of print doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095362.
  26. Timmins R, Bourne M, Shield A, Williams M, Lorenzen C & Opar D. Architectural adaptations of muscle to training and injury: a narrative review outlining the contributions by fascicle length, pennation angle and muscle thickness. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Epub ahead of print doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-094881..
  27. Bourne M, Williams M, Opar D, Al Najjar A, Kerr G & Shield A. Impact of exercise selection on hamstring muscle activation. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Epub ahead of print doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095739.
  28. Duhig S, Shield AJ, Opar D, Gabbett TJ, Ferguson C, Williams M. Effect of high-speed running on hamstring strain injury risk. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Epub ahead of print doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2015-095679.
  29. Bourne M, Duhig S, Timmins R, Williams M, Opar D, Al Najjar A, Kerr G, Shield A. Impact of the Nordic hamstring and hip extension exercises on hamstring architecture and morphology: implications for injury prevention. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Epub ahead of print doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-096130. 

 

Research

My research focuses on hamstring strain injuries (HSI), in particular how to mitigate the risk of HSI and how best to rehabilitate these injuries. Our research group, the ACU Hamstring Injury Group, runs projects that cover a number of disciplines in the field of exercise science, for projects that covers the spectrum from lab-based all the way through to applied and field based projects, at the recreational and elite levels of sport.  

Professional Memberships
  • Sports Medicine Australia
  • American College of Sports Medicine
 

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